Links for Week Ending 29 Dec 12

Articles and posts that caught my eye over the last week:

  • John Mason over at Skeptical Science gives us a current state of play with respect to climate change and food production. The mid-term outlook here looks horrible and rising food prices will tell the story.
  • Ugo Bardi, author of the excellent book “The Limits to Growth Revisited“, reflects on the threat of climate change vis a vis peak oil. This is a topic close to my heart and one I have posted on regularly including here.
  • Dr Jeff Masters puts in perspective another year of weather extremes in the U.S. on his wonderful blog here.
  • In the NYT, Tom Friedman looks at the disastrous anti-science stance that has been adopted by the Republican party and much else: “It can’t win with a base that is at war with math, physics, human biology, economics and common-sense gun laws all at the same time.”  In my humble opinion, climate change should not be a wedge issue. I am glad that I live in a country where you can adhere to either the right or left in politics but still believe in climate change. This used to be true in the USA, and I hope will one day be true again.
  • Much chatter about leaked drafts of the new Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report suggesting a bigger role for the solar cycle. Real Climate sees this as nothing but a storm in a teacup.
  • Prof Hamilton highlights a Post Carbon Institute presentation that questions the hype surrounding shale oil production at his Econbrowser blog  here.
  • The “end of economic growth” has been a major concern of many non-economists for decades but only a heretical few in the economics profession have given the idea much serious thought. Recently, the famed, and very much mainstream, growth economist Robert Gordon came out with a paper supporting the idea. We now have a lively debate on the subject that can be easily followed on Economist’s View, such as this contribution from Paul Krugman here.
  • Chris Giles in the FT addresses the collapse in UK productivity since 2007 (here).   Not sure if his advocacy of the German model to restore growth makes any sense though.
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